If that isn’t enough, Kenny shares a range of his valuable personal insights and experiences that we can all certainly learn from.” –Ilan Goldstein, Agile Solutions Manager, Reed Elsevier, “Scrum is elegantly simple, yet deceptively complex. Ken's book covered similar course material, but with more depth and very good discussion on the various alternatives available. — Mike Cohn, author of "Succeeding with Agile", Certified Scrum Trainer, "I am happy to say that I can definitely recommend Mitch’s book! Please try again. Want to help the team come to a common understanding of Scrum? Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2017. The table of contents and content summary for the book, "Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide of the Most Popular Agile Process" by Ken Rubin. : alk. If you by one book on Scrum, this should be it! It might have ‘Scrum’ in the title, but the book leverages effective practices from the larger agile universe to help managers and their teams succeed.” –Lisa Crispin, coauthor, Agile Testing, “Kenny Rubin managed to write the book that I want everyone associated with Scrum development to read! Essential Scrum provides an ideal overview of both the big picture and the details in an accessible style. Includes bibliographical references and index. I wish I had this kind of book when I started using Scrum.” –Geir Hedemark, Development Manager, Basefarm AS, “I am convinced that Essential Scrum will become the foundation reference for the next generation of Scrum practitioners. Chapter 5: Requirements and User Stories 79, Managing the Accrual of Technical Debt 149, Product Owner Combined with Other Roles 181, Aligning and Adapting the Environment 233, Chapter 14: Scrum Planning Principles 247, Don’t Assume We Can Get the Plans Right Up Front 248, Up-Front Planning Should Be Helpful without Being Excessive 248, Keep Planning Options Open Until the Last Responsible Moment 249, Focus More on Adapting and Replanning Than on Conforming to a Plan 249, Correctly Manage the Planning Inventory 251, Favor Smaller and More Frequent Releases 252, Plan to Learn Fast and Pivot When Necessary 254, Chapter 17: Envisioning (Product Planning) 287, Chapter 18: Release Planning (Longer-Term Planning) 307, Refine Minimum Releasable Features (MRFs) 316, Using Scrum to Discover the Path Forward 397, Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide to the Most Popular Agile Process -- Access Code In this illuminating series of case studies, Scrum co-creator and evangelist Ken Schwaber identifies the real-world lessons—the successes and failures—culled from his years of experience coaching companies in agile project management. Excellent book for new or established Scrum Teams, Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2013. Whether you are new to Scrum or years into your use, this book will introduce, clarify, and deepen your Scrum knowledge at the team, product, and portfolio levels. There's a problem loading this menu right now. The visual icon language used throughout this book will help you help them. Readers will understand the value of building quality in, and the reality that we can’t get everything right up front; we must work incrementally and learn as we go. -- Tim Lister, Principal, The Atlantic Systems Guild, Inc, Addison-Wesley Professional; 1st edition (July 26, 2012). I. — Mike Cohn, author of "Succeeding with Agile", Certified Scrum Trainer, "This book is an excellent guide for anyone looking to improve how he or she delivers software, and I recommend it highly." It dives into the details of how to become more agile through implementing Scrum processes, and it explains exactly how to break down complex projects into manageable initiatives (or ‘sprints’). Rubin’s executive management roles have included CEO, COO, VP of Engineering, VP of Product Management, and VP of Professional Services. Real-world experiences coupled with enlightening illustrations make Scrum come to life. He covers everything you’ll need to know about Scrum and more!” –Martine Devos, European Scrum Pioneer and Certified Scrum Trainer, “I’ve reviewed a number of agile books in the past few years, so the question of ‘Do we really need another one?’ always comes to my mind. 3. Covers everything. Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide to the Most Popular Agile Process, ©2013 It dives into the details of how to become more agile through implementing Scrum processes, and it explains exactly how to break down complex projects into manageable initiatives (or ‘sprints’).