There was a minor uproar, and they commented that while their old microphones may well be considered vintage classics, they were the best technology they could produce at the time. basically dont read anything, or talk to anyone. I bet a real U67 reissue would sell like crazy, it will be interesting to see if this mic catches on. Once compressed, the U67 had a noticeable edge over the TLM variant. by Meriphew » Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:30 am, Post I don't have to worry about getting clients through the door, and neither do I generally have clients that would know the difference if I put a U-67 or an SM-57 up in front of them. Anyone seen these new Neumann mics yet??? See also: Neumann TLM 102 vs U87! by red cross » Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:32 am, Post by Professor » Sat Jun 14, 2008 11:46 pm, Post by GooberNumber9 » Sat Jun 14, 2008 9:42 am, Post Cutting off the service was actually a way of trying to encourage people to recognize that they didn't stop building microphones and innovating their designs back in the 70s. I bet a real U67 reissue would sell like crazy, it will be interesting to see if this mic catches on. They each also have a 10dB pre-attenuation pad, which is handy for handling a loud singer or instrument, and a high-pass filter which can attenuate LF noise such as handling noise and wind. But instead of electron tubes the TLM 67 relies on trouble free FET electronics with a special sound design for a gorgeous retro tone. by Professor » Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:24 pm, Post I could spend $2500 and get a single LA-2A compressor. by aitikin » Sat Jun 14, 2008 11:15 am, Post Cutting off the service was actually a way of trying to encourage people to recognize that they didn't stop building microphones and innovating their designs back in the 70s. With these polar patterns, both Neumann U67 and Neumann U87 can be very versatile and useful in various recording situations. The tube U67 paired beautifully with our UA1176 & TubeTech CL1B compressors – emphasizing the rich lower-mid frequencies without aggressively altering the smooth transient response. There was a minor uproar, and they commented that while their old microphones may well be considered vintage classics, they were the best technology they could produce at the time. In comparison, the TLM felt strained in the upper-mid frequency range, even when using milder compression settings. The TLM 67 uses an electronic circuit instead of an output transformer - the TLM bit stands for Transformer-Less Microphone - and it's the … Since then, they have done lots of research and development and currently build microphones that are far better than any of their old ones ever were... at least in their opinion. by Professor » Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:00 pm, Post Modern Neumanns are off my microphone buying radar at this point. It uses the same K67 capsule and features a special circuit design that closely reproduces the valve or tube sound characteristics of the U67. If that's what you want you need to buy Geffel. I thought TLM meant "Too Little Money" to afford this mic... "It's not a recording studio without a lava lamp". Since then, they have done lots of research and development and currently build microphones that are far better than any of their old ones ever were... at least in their opinion. One of these days, I'm just going to get board with reading some of the threads, I'm just going to read all of your posts Jeremy. ↳   5/03-2/05: Off-Topic / Off-Color / Off-the-Cuff, ↳   5/03-2/05: Musicians Wanted/Available, ↳   5/03-2/05: Producer/Engineer and Studio Job Listings, http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TLM67SetZ/, http://www.gearslutz.com/board/moan-zon ... -true.html, http://recforums.prosoundweb.com/index. ...serving the creative recording community since 2001... Post They claim it is supposed to capture all the sound characteristics of a U67 without the use of tubes or transformers...seems a little unrealistic. It would take something pretty amazing to get me interested. 1- The U-67 responded a tiny bit slower (it is, after all, a tube mic) 2- The U-67 was slightly noisier (it is, after all, a tube mic) Otherwise, the tone and timbre seemed to be almost dead-on. To mark Neumann's 80th year of business, the TLM 67 is based on the company's classic 1960s U67 microphone. by Slider » Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:59 am, Post It's got a pretty cool two tone look to it but the huge half dollar emblem thing is wierd looking. by aitikin » Sat Jun 14, 2008 10:40 pm, Post You cannot compare the Nuemann of today which is owned by Sennheiser to the original company. ... 0/0/0/862/, http://recforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/m/344356/0/. I think its strange Neumann is spending so much time and effort making stripped down versions of their classic mics, instead of making exact reissues like almost every other manufacturer. by Mystic Steamship Co. » Fri Jun 13, 2008 11:25 pm, Post Joel, you make a fair point. ever. They're so damned informative! I remember years ago when Neumann announced that it would no longer service its microphones built before 1980 or some similar kind of date. This TLM67 is business as usual for them. by Rick Slater » Tue Jun 17, 2008 7:53 pm, Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 28 guests, Recording Techniques, People Skills, Gear, Recording Spaces, Computers, and DIY. The TLM 67 captures the spirit of Neumann’s classic U 67, which defined the sound of the 1960s. Like its predecessor, the TLM 67 is a versatile studio workhorse with three polar patterns, pad and low cut options. by joel hamilton » Mon Jun 16, 2008 11:26 am, Post ps - And before anyone asks, yes, if someone were willing to pony up the $15,000 for our pair of U-67s, then I would probably try to find a way to sell them and pick up a half dozen or more new Neumann offerings... maybe the TLM-67s, maybe a couple M-149s, definitely a pair of U-89s, etc. by joel hamilton » Sun Jun 15, 2008 2:37 pm, Post Well, maybe there would be a flash of recognition for the '57 from their last bar gig. Oh. Whatever. And since then, I have had that initial observation reinforced on other instruments, sessions, and comparisons.