The distinct array of troops below her would seem to be the whole point of this shot, but it’s hard to see each separate grouping in the original. Maybe it’s an empty field? The effect was lovely, and I so wish there were more of it to see. That's a vast difference in the quantity of image data available to the display and it's perhaps the best justification for optical discs we've seen in recent years. So we wondered, what if you could see? No tap-dancing and zero Judi Dench, but Idris is still committed to delivering a gift to you this Christmas. Or they were calibrated correctly, but the ideal viewing experience is really in a theater. I had no idea how he got back to the main action when he showed up later! If you've never changed a single setting on your TV then some tuning is something to be considered, but it's not as simple as turning the brightness up or down. Yeah but those are the real colors of the long night. https://www.vulture.com/2019/05/game-of-thrones-the-long-night-brighter.html The Smashing Pumpkins front man on his new double LP. That's a close-up of a typical stream of Game of Thrones, paused and photographed. That's reflected in scenes of light too - the lighting of the trench, for example, which not only brings relief from the battle, but from the oppressive darkness of the episode for the viewer. A Blu-ray by contrast has a bitrate of 40Mbps, while Ultra HD Blu-ray steps that up again. In the US, Amazon's version is better than HBO, but all fall down: streaming services aren't providing the data that people need to watch this episode. The lightened image isn’t that much more helpful, but at least you can sort of see it’s a dagger, and that it has rough edges, suggesting one of Winterfell’s newly forged dragonglass weapons, rather than the curved blade of Arya’s Valyrian steel. This image is on a 4K TV, but the resolution becomes irrelevant when there's nothing to display - you'll see similar on an 8K TV, a phone or iPad, just as you'll encounter problems whether you have an LED or OLED TV. Turns out there’s a shot where you can see him riding back to the castle! Streaming has completely shaken up how we consume content, but dark scenes hang over the convenience that streaming offers like the Sword of Damocles - and it all comes down to data and compression. The data rate you get from your streaming service is governed by several factors - there's the maximum bitrate the service provides (10Mbps for Amazon US, 5Mbps for HBO Go, as this thread discusses) and then there's the variable bitrate that services use to make sure your content keeps playing and you avoid buffering. Allow Drew Barrymore to Introduce You to Her Chickens, “You can almost do anything to them when they’re laying eggs.”, A compact, samurai movie-inspired episode offers up a flood of new information about Mando’s Jedi companion, and even more, It says something that even Amy Adams’s own fans don’t want the actress to win her long-awaited trophy for. I mean, if you edit the images to bring out the colours, then yes. Yes, I can tell that this is an image of the groups beneath the crypts in the original lighting. Take a look at the brightened side-by-side comparison of “The Long Night” below. Billy Corgan on the Best, Worst, and Pumpkin Chord-iest of Smashing Pumpkins. Who knew! Except, if the image is so dark that you can hardly see any faces, that very creepy facet of the battle has less impact. Let's start with something called narrative. Artistically, it puts the viewer in the position of the defenders we're supporting, drawing you into the narrative, to great effect. Some TVs have a calibration process you can go through, which is as much about setting the TV to suit your preferences and the environment that it's in than anything else. Brighten definition: If someone brightens or their face brightens , they suddenly look happier . All rights reserved. All rights reserved. In the UK, Sky's version is better than Now TV - but having watched both the Sky transmission and Now TV, Sky still has problems, like banding in the colours and lines where, again, there isn't the data to complete the picture. Log in or link your magazine subscription, The Battle of Winterfell, Only You Can Actually See It, Baby Yoda Has a Real Name and You’re Not Gonna Like It, All 131 Van Halen Songs, Ranked From Worst to Best, Eric Clapton Joins Van Morrison for New ‘Anti-Lockdown’ Song ‘Stand and Deliver’, Oscar Futures: An Elegy for Amy Adams’s Chances. It’s a skirmish between White Walkers and the Unsullied. The Battle of Winterfell, playing out in the season 8 episode “The Long Night,” took an arduous 55 nights to shoot, and was the largest-scale battle sequence in Thrones history. Finally, if you have the option to download the episode, you'll get more data than streaming - and remove the effect of variable bitrates - for a better viewing experience. No, it's really about a lack of data, but if your TV isn't well setup, you'll not be getting the most from it visually. The dark, muddy scenes from "The Long Night" episode sparked a lot of complaints and exposed the weaknesses of streaming. In a lighter version you can even see the horizon line, which is really helpful when you’re trying to get a sense of scale and distance. I want to have seen all their faces crumpling away! Wired spoke to the cinematographer behind the episode, Fabian Wagner, who defended the episode's presentation: "Another look would have been wrong," he says. At the same time, if your TV has an ambient light sensor you might want to consider turning that off too - as it will then darkness the image again. 2003 - 2020 © Pocket-lint Limited PO Box 4770, Ascot, SL5 5DP. Since you probably have all the scary pandemic drama you need for the moment. Arya, very pointedly, hands Sansa something, and you can tell from the context of their dialogue that it’s a dagger. This can result in a custom picture mode that's better than the standard. … and it’s not even filming in Floribama! No way to know, really! It's the old digital problem - not enough data to complete the picture. Every shot inside the crypts could’ve been this beautiful glowing image of humanity trapped in an underground tomb, and on most televisions all viewers could see was murk. Take a look at the photo above. England and Wales company registration number 5237480. What could you see in the battle that maybe you otherwise missed? Oh look! *Sorry, there was a problem signing you up. The lighter image here doesn’t dramatically change what you know about events. When the image is lightened, though, you can actually see the horde. "The Long Night" was one of the most highly anticipated episodes of the critically acclaimed series, now in its final season on HBO.. And while plenty happened––Arya Stark taking down the Night King and Melisandre fulfilling her purpose, for starters––one of the biggest complaints in the wake of the broadcast was that the episode was too dark to tell what was going on. Display technology isn't the magic bullet to fix this problem. Here are some things you can do to improve the viewing experience now. You can't see what's coming, until it's right in your face. Already a subscriber? How John Wilson Made the Perfect COVID-Era TV Finale. Wake Up From Your Thanksgiving Food Coma to J.Lo’s New Single ‘In the Morning’. Your dried-out turkey might leave a bad taste in your mouth, but Jennifer never will. Another plot point made unnecessarily confusing by a lack of decent lighting. That's a close-up of a typical stream of Game of Thrones, paused and photographed. Based on facts, either observed and verified firsthand by the reporter, or reported and verified from knowledgeable sources. It's been lightened slightly, but you can see the blockiness and lines where there's a lack of data. Who knows what this field of mottled blackness might be. As any Game of Thrones viewer knows by now, Sunday’s episode, “The Long Night,” was too dark. You can even see the terror on this poor person’s face! Slide on below for a brightened view of some key scenes from “The Long Night.” (And for those who can make out things just fine in the original images — congratulations on your A+ monitor calibration skills!). Here’s what you can do to get the show looking its best.